Connect with us

Science

Israeli moon lander passes final tests as it gets ready to take off on February eighteenth and place a ‘time capsule’ on the lunar surface

Published

on

Israel’s first moon lander has breezed through its last tests in front of its historic blastoff on February eighteenth.

SpaceIL’s lander — which has been named Beresheet, the Hebrew word for ‘In the Beginning’ will take off from Cape Canaveral on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

It plans to land somewhere close to the landing sites of Apollo 15 and 17, and will convey a ‘digital time capsule’ nearby a suite of scientific instruments.

‘We are looking forward to the launch & the challenging journey ahead…’SpaceIL’s CEO Dr. Ido Anteby said.

In the event that it is effective, Israel will be the fourth nation to complete a controlled ‘soft’ landing of an unmanned vessel on the moon.

Since 1966, the United States and the former Soviet Union have put around a dozen of them on the moon and China did as such in 2013, and not long ago when it landed on the most distant side of the moon.

Israel has propelled satellites previously, however this is the first longer-range Israeli spacecraft of its sort.

The art, called Beresheet, Hebrew for Genesis, is molded like a round table with four carbon-fiber legs, remains about 1.5 meters tall and weighs 585 kg (1,290 lb) – with fuel representing 66% of that weight.

The time capsule is a single, space-resilient disc, roughly the size of a CD, holding digital files of kids’ illustrations, photos and data on Israeli culture and the historical backdrop of humanity.

Mark David is a writer best known for his science fiction, but over the course of his life he published more than sixty books of fiction and non-fiction, including children's books, poetry, short stories, essays, and young-adult fiction. He publishes news on apstersmedia.com related to the science.

Science

Experts warn that if we don’t reduce space junk, aliens will go unnoticed

Published

on

With an estimated 8,000 or more satellites currently orbiting the Earth, there have been four times as many as there were in 2019.

According to a story in The Independent, by the end of this decade, the night sky will be crowded with satellites and obscured by stars, making it impossible for astronomers to detect extraterrestrial life and other discoveries.

With an estimated 8,000 or more satellites currently orbiting the Earth, there have been four times as many as there were in 2019. This number is expected to increase at an alarming rate because to the expansion in the commercial space sector.

The sheer number of deorbiting satellites has also been a source of concern for astronomers. When all internet constellations are operational, roughly 16,000 decaying internet satellites will need to be removed from orbit at any one time, according to Ken MacLeod, an independent specialist on non-functional satellites. The re-entry of space debris will result in fireballs, with Kate estimating at least 60 dropping day. Experts predict that the proliferation of satellites will have negative effects on astronomy and permanently alter the night sky.

Continue Reading

Science

Study: Human Muscles Were Inventively Developed To Keep Us Warm

Published

on

The ordinary person can tell by looking at their body temperature how much heat their muscles, organs, and brain are producing. A recent study argues that our muscles have evolved a clever mechanism to keep us warm even when they aren’t working, which lends support to this hypothesis.

Researchers from the University of Queensland claim that mammals’ resting muscles generate more heat, which can subsequently be transferred to other parts of the body.

Warm-blooded mammals, like humans, and cold-blooded animals, like frogs and toads, employ the same fundamental muscle structures to generate force for posture and movement, according to Bradley Launikonis, an associate professor at the UQ School of Biomedical Science.

This study adds to our understanding of how mammals evolved and lays the groundwork for future efforts to harness our muscles’ ability to burn calories while we’re at rest.

For instance, this might help obese individuals lose weight.

Continue Reading

Science

An image of a distant black hole destroying a star

Published

on

More than halfway across the known universe, astronomers have observed an act of tremendous violence as a black hole rips apart a star that got too close to this celestial savage. But this was not your typical case of a hungry black hole.

It was one of only four examples – and the first since 2011 – of a black hole observed in the act of tearing apart a passing star in what is called a tidal disruption event and then launching luminous jets of high-energy particles in opposite directions into space, researchers said. And it was the most distant and brilliant such event ever observed.

A supermassive black hole estimated to be hundreds of millions of times as large as our sun and located about 8.5 billion light years from Earth looks to be the culprit. 5.9 trillion miles is the distance that light travels in a year, or a light year (9.5 trillion km).

According to University of Minnesota astronomer and study co-author Michael Coughlin, “when a star dangerously approaches a black hole – no worries, this will not happen to the sun – it is violently ripped apart by the black hole’s gravitational tidal forces – similar to how the moon pulls tides on Earth but with greater strength.” (Watch the tidal disruption event animation.)

Much like the Milky Way and most galaxies, the supermassive black hole is thought to be located at the centre of a galaxy. However, the tidal disruption event was so intense that it blocked out the stars of the galaxy.

Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!