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NASA will declare “Exciting New Discovery” about the Moon made from the Airborne Observatory

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NASA will report an exciting new discovery about the Moon from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) at a media video chat at 12 p.m. EDT Monday, October 26. Sound of the video chat will transfer live on the organization’s site.

This new discovery adds to NASA’s endeavors to find out about the Moon on the side of profound space investigation. Under NASA’s Artemis program, the office will send the main lady and next man to the lunar surface in 2024 to get ready for our next monster jump – human investigation of Mars as ahead of schedule as the 2030s. Understanding the study of the Moon additionally helps piece together the more extensive history of the inward nearby planetary group.

Preparation members are:

  • Paul Hertz, Astrophysics division director at NASA Headquarters, Washington
  • Jacob Bleacher, chief exploration scientist for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters
  • Casey Honniball, postdoctoral fellow at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland
  • Naseem Rangwala, project scientist for the SOFIA mission, NASA’s Ames Research Center, Silicon Valley, California

As the world’s biggest airborne observatory, SOFIA is an adjusted 747 that flies high in the climate to furnish its almost 9-foot telescope with an away from of the universe and items in our close planetary system. Hovering above 99% of the air’s darkening water fume, SOFIA sees in infrared frequencies and can recognize wonders difficult to see with obvious light.

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Study: Human Muscles Were Inventively Developed To Keep Us Warm

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The ordinary person can tell by looking at their body temperature how much heat their muscles, organs, and brain are producing. A recent study argues that our muscles have evolved a clever mechanism to keep us warm even when they aren’t working, which lends support to this hypothesis.

Researchers from the University of Queensland claim that mammals’ resting muscles generate more heat, which can subsequently be transferred to other parts of the body.

Warm-blooded mammals, like humans, and cold-blooded animals, like frogs and toads, employ the same fundamental muscle structures to generate force for posture and movement, according to Bradley Launikonis, an associate professor at the UQ School of Biomedical Science.

This study adds to our understanding of how mammals evolved and lays the groundwork for future efforts to harness our muscles’ ability to burn calories while we’re at rest.

For instance, this might help obese individuals lose weight.

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An image of a distant black hole destroying a star

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More than halfway across the known universe, astronomers have observed an act of tremendous violence as a black hole rips apart a star that got too close to this celestial savage. But this was not your typical case of a hungry black hole.

It was one of only four examples – and the first since 2011 – of a black hole observed in the act of tearing apart a passing star in what is called a tidal disruption event and then launching luminous jets of high-energy particles in opposite directions into space, researchers said. And it was the most distant and brilliant such event ever observed.

A supermassive black hole estimated to be hundreds of millions of times as large as our sun and located about 8.5 billion light years from Earth looks to be the culprit. 5.9 trillion miles is the distance that light travels in a year, or a light year (9.5 trillion km).

According to University of Minnesota astronomer and study co-author Michael Coughlin, “when a star dangerously approaches a black hole – no worries, this will not happen to the sun – it is violently ripped apart by the black hole’s gravitational tidal forces – similar to how the moon pulls tides on Earth but with greater strength.” (Watch the tidal disruption event animation.)

Much like the Milky Way and most galaxies, the supermassive black hole is thought to be located at the centre of a galaxy. However, the tidal disruption event was so intense that it blocked out the stars of the galaxy.

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NASA’s Artemis I Moon Mission Breaks the Record Set by Apollo 13

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Washington: NASA’s unmanned Orion spacecraft has broken the previous record set in 1970 by the astronauts of the failed Apollo 13 Moon landing mission.

During the Artemis I mission, the unmanned Orion spacecraft from NASA travelled the furthest from Earth: 268,563 miles (432,210).

The previous record was established during the Apollo 13 mission, which was 400,171 kilometres (248,655 miles) from Earth.

NASA released a statement late on Monday saying, “The spacecraft also captured photos of Earth and the Moon together throughout the day, including of the Moon appearing to eclipse Earth.”

Soon, the spacecraft will use the Moon’s gravitational pull once more, together with a precisely planned lunar flyby burn, to hurl Orion back toward Earth in preparation for its December 11 splashdown in the Pacific.

The systems needed for astronauts to survive and breathe in outer space will be put to the test during the Artemis II mission.

The equipment needed for astronauts to survive and breathe in outer space will be put to the test during the Artemis II mission.

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