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SpaceX successfully launches 5th GPS satellite aboard reused rocket for US Space Force

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SpaceX has successfully launched the fifth GPS satellite for the U.S. military.

The GPS III SV05 satellite – nicknamed for NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong – launched on board the 227-foot-tall Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, taking off at 12:09 p.m. ET.

“We have liftoff! The Falcon 9 rocket carrying the latest GPS III satellite has launched!” the Space Force Space and Missiles Systems Center said, retweeting SpaceX’s Twitter video of the moment.

Arrangement of the Lockheed Martin-assembled satellite was affirmed over 90 minutes after the fact.

It is expected to maneuver into a 12,550-mile-high orbit, as indicated by Spaceflight Now, and join the current constellation of satellites.

Three advanced GPS III missions have recently launched on Falcon 9 rockets throughout the most recent few years and Space.com revealed Thursday that the U.S, military intends to dispatch a sum of 10 redesigned GPS satellites to replace some older ones effectively in space.

The next-generation satellites will include “new technology and advanced capabilities” and meet the “needs of the military to mitigate threats” to GPS infrastructure, as indicated by Lockheed Martin.

The aerospace defense organization said that the satellites are the “most powerful GPS satellite ever built,” with multiple times times greater accuracy and up to multiple times expanded enemy of jam insurance.

“GPS III was also intentionally created with a modular design so that new technology and capabilities could be added as technology changes or new mission needs change,” it noted.

The following GPS III mission – likewise contracted to the Elon Musk-founded company – is scheduled for at some point in 2022.

Notwithstanding the satellite, the pre-owned rocket flew a payload for the first time.

It was SpaceX’s 19th mission this year and its 89th successful booster recovery, with Falcon 9’s first stage arriving at around 12:19 p.m. ET on the Just Read the Instructions droneship positioned in the Atlantic Ocean.

In another first, SpaceX’s recovery vessel HOS Briarwood would make its debut to recuperate the payload fairings after they fall back to Earth.

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Experts warn that if we don’t reduce space junk, aliens will go unnoticed

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With an estimated 8,000 or more satellites currently orbiting the Earth, there have been four times as many as there were in 2019.

According to a story in The Independent, by the end of this decade, the night sky will be crowded with satellites and obscured by stars, making it impossible for astronomers to detect extraterrestrial life and other discoveries.

With an estimated 8,000 or more satellites currently orbiting the Earth, there have been four times as many as there were in 2019. This number is expected to increase at an alarming rate because to the expansion in the commercial space sector.

The sheer number of deorbiting satellites has also been a source of concern for astronomers. When all internet constellations are operational, roughly 16,000 decaying internet satellites will need to be removed from orbit at any one time, according to Ken MacLeod, an independent specialist on non-functional satellites. The re-entry of space debris will result in fireballs, with Kate estimating at least 60 dropping day. Experts predict that the proliferation of satellites will have negative effects on astronomy and permanently alter the night sky.

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Study: Human Muscles Were Inventively Developed To Keep Us Warm

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The ordinary person can tell by looking at their body temperature how much heat their muscles, organs, and brain are producing. A recent study argues that our muscles have evolved a clever mechanism to keep us warm even when they aren’t working, which lends support to this hypothesis.

Researchers from the University of Queensland claim that mammals’ resting muscles generate more heat, which can subsequently be transferred to other parts of the body.

Warm-blooded mammals, like humans, and cold-blooded animals, like frogs and toads, employ the same fundamental muscle structures to generate force for posture and movement, according to Bradley Launikonis, an associate professor at the UQ School of Biomedical Science.

This study adds to our understanding of how mammals evolved and lays the groundwork for future efforts to harness our muscles’ ability to burn calories while we’re at rest.

For instance, this might help obese individuals lose weight.

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An image of a distant black hole destroying a star

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More than halfway across the known universe, astronomers have observed an act of tremendous violence as a black hole rips apart a star that got too close to this celestial savage. But this was not your typical case of a hungry black hole.

It was one of only four examples – and the first since 2011 – of a black hole observed in the act of tearing apart a passing star in what is called a tidal disruption event and then launching luminous jets of high-energy particles in opposite directions into space, researchers said. And it was the most distant and brilliant such event ever observed.

A supermassive black hole estimated to be hundreds of millions of times as large as our sun and located about 8.5 billion light years from Earth looks to be the culprit. 5.9 trillion miles is the distance that light travels in a year, or a light year (9.5 trillion km).

According to University of Minnesota astronomer and study co-author Michael Coughlin, “when a star dangerously approaches a black hole – no worries, this will not happen to the sun – it is violently ripped apart by the black hole’s gravitational tidal forces – similar to how the moon pulls tides on Earth but with greater strength.” (Watch the tidal disruption event animation.)

Much like the Milky Way and most galaxies, the supermassive black hole is thought to be located at the centre of a galaxy. However, the tidal disruption event was so intense that it blocked out the stars of the galaxy.

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