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Northern Light May 2019: The Northern Lights Will Be Visible Over the U.S. Tonight. Here’s How to Watch Them.

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Like the skies over King’s Landing following the entry of Daenerys, there will be stunning (yet altogether less terrifying) lights over parts of the United States this week. The northern lights will make a journey south the morning of May 15, as well as the night of May 16 into the morning of May 17.

The Space Weather Prediction Center has issued geomagnetic storm alerts varying somewhere in the range of G1 and G2levels because of a series of three Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) since May 10 – the impacts of which are foreseen to have the northern lights appearing further south than they are usually seen.

The caution from the SWPC, some part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), was issued alongside the guide above. It demonstrates the area where the aurora could conceivably reach. The guide is somewhat little, yet the green line is the thing that you ought to search for with a G1 alert, while any window with a G2 alert could reach as far south as the yellow line.

The methods you could see the spectacular display in parts of Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Maine. As is often the case, you should also be able to see a very good show in Alaska, which is among the best places in the world for aurora hunters. During a G2 alert, you might also catch a glimpse in Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

the aurora borealis over Michigan’s Mackinac Bridge in mid 2018 after a G1 alert. The northern lights are beautifully present, however this far south, you’re probably not going to locate the splendid strips of colorful lights popping over the sky like you may discover in, Say, Iceland. (For a good example of well-defined streaks of light, check out this “Dragon Aurora” spotted in Iceland.)

How To See the Northern Lights

Per the SWPC’s 3-Day Forecast, the best time to look for northern lights will be through two or three separate windows. The first is 5am to 11am EST on Wednesday, May 15. This could be a not too bad open door further west at the beginning of the window when it is as yet dim outside. The Kp index prior to that window is only slightly lower, so you may even catch a glimpse leading into that time frame. However, as it gets light outside, the display will no longer be visible, rendering the latter portion of the alert useless for anyone hoping to see the aurora.

The second window is from 11am EST on May 16 to 2am on May 17. That whole stretch is under a G1 alert, with the exception of a three-hour window where there’s a G2. Unfortunately, it will be too light out to see the aurora in the US at that time.

To get the best view, you should get a long way from the light pollution of urban focuses. On the off chance that the aurora makes it right to the green line, it’s still impossible you’ll spot it in a major city. Talking about the best conditions for viewing the aurora, a SWPC representative recently told, “You need very clear skies, a good view of the northern horizon (no trees, buildings, or hills), and it needs to be dark.” The view is necessary because, outside of far-north regions, the lights will largely appear on the northern horizon rather than directly overhead.

This is a great opportunity to cross the spectacle off your bucket list. Plus, you’ll get quality outdoor time. That’s good. You’ve been sitting inside a bit too much lately.

Mark David is a writer best known for his science fiction, but over the course of his life he published more than sixty books of fiction and non-fiction, including children's books, poetry, short stories, essays, and young-adult fiction. He publishes news on apstersmedia.com related to the science.

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SpaceX dispatches second committed rideshare mission

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SpaceX dispatched 88 satellites on a Falcon 9 June 30 on the organization’s second devoted smallsat rideshare mission.

The Falcon 9 took off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station at 3:31 p.m. Eastern, more than most of the way into an almost hourlong dispatch window due to climate. A dispatch endeavor the day preceding was cleaned when a private helicopter entered limited airspace minutes before the planned takeoff.

Sending of the payload of 88 satellites began almost 58 minutes after takeoff, when the upper stage played out a second consume of its motor to put it’s anything but a sun-coordinated circle at an elevation of almost 550 kilometers. The satellites, from an assortment of government and business clients, were delivered over 30 minutes.

The mission, named Transporter-2 by SpaceX, was the organization’s second committed smallsat rideshare mission, after the Transporter-1 mission in January. The prior flight conveyed 143 satellites, yet SpaceX said the absolute payload mass for Transporter-2 was more prominent than that of Transporter-1. The organization didn’t uncover explicit payload mass figures for one or the other mission.

The Transporter-2 payload show included manufactured gap radar (SAR) satellites from three contending organizations: Capella, Iceye and Umbra. HawkEye 360 and Kleos, two organizations conveying heavenly bodies to perform radio-recurrence following, each had satellites on this mission, as did PlanetIQ and Spire, which gather GPS radio occultation information for use in climate anticipating.

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SpaceX successfully launches 5th GPS satellite aboard reused rocket for US Space Force

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SpaceX has successfully launched the fifth GPS satellite for the U.S. military.

The GPS III SV05 satellite – nicknamed for NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong – launched on board the 227-foot-tall Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, taking off at 12:09 p.m. ET.

“We have liftoff! The Falcon 9 rocket carrying the latest GPS III satellite has launched!” the Space Force Space and Missiles Systems Center said, retweeting SpaceX’s Twitter video of the moment.

Arrangement of the Lockheed Martin-assembled satellite was affirmed over 90 minutes after the fact.

It is expected to maneuver into a 12,550-mile-high orbit, as indicated by Spaceflight Now, and join the current constellation of satellites.

Three advanced GPS III missions have recently launched on Falcon 9 rockets throughout the most recent few years and Space.com revealed Thursday that the U.S, military intends to dispatch a sum of 10 redesigned GPS satellites to replace some older ones effectively in space.

The next-generation satellites will include “new technology and advanced capabilities” and meet the “needs of the military to mitigate threats” to GPS infrastructure, as indicated by Lockheed Martin.

The aerospace defense organization said that the satellites are the “most powerful GPS satellite ever built,” with multiple times times greater accuracy and up to multiple times expanded enemy of jam insurance.

“GPS III was also intentionally created with a modular design so that new technology and capabilities could be added as technology changes or new mission needs change,” it noted.

The following GPS III mission – likewise contracted to the Elon Musk-founded company – is scheduled for at some point in 2022.

Notwithstanding the satellite, the pre-owned rocket flew a payload for the first time.

It was SpaceX’s 19th mission this year and its 89th successful booster recovery, with Falcon 9’s first stage arriving at around 12:19 p.m. ET on the Just Read the Instructions droneship positioned in the Atlantic Ocean.

In another first, SpaceX’s recovery vessel HOS Briarwood would make its debut to recuperate the payload fairings after they fall back to Earth.

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World’s littlest dinosaur is really a ‘weird’ ancient lizard, researchers say

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A tiny skull entombed in 99-million-year-old amber that became the subject of scientific debate last year was at first idea to have a place with the world’s littlest dinosaur species.

In any case, the high-profile March 2020 scientific paper that unveiled the disclosure of Oculudentavis khaungraae was withdrawn sometime thereafter. New exploration distributed on Monday, in light of another, better-safeguarded amber specimen, recommends that the skull was from an prehistoric lizard.

“It’s a really weird animal. It’s unlike any other lizard we have today,” said co-creator of the new examination Juan Diego Daza, a herpetologist and aide professor of biological sciences at Sam Houston State University in Texas, in a news discharge.

“We estimate that many lizards originated during this time, but they still hadn’t evolved their modern appearance,” he said. “That’s why they can trick us. They may have characteristics of this group or that one, but in reality, they don’t match perfectly.”

The creators of the new paper published in the journal Current Biology named the creature Oculudentavis naga out of appreciation for the Naga individuals of India and Myanmar, where the golden was found. They said it was from similar family or class as Oculudentavis khaungraae, yet likely an alternate animal varieties.

Oculudentavis means “eye tooth bird” in Latin, however Daza said taxonomic rules for naming and organizing animal species implied that they needed to keep utilizing it despite the fact that it wasn’t exact.

“Since Oculudentavis is the name originally used to describe this taxon, it has priority and we have to maintain it,” Daxa said. “The taxonomy can be sometimes deceiving.”

The better-preserved amber, which was found in a similar golden mining locale in Myanmar as the first depicted Oculudentavis example, held piece of the reptile’s skeleton, including its skull, with visible scales and soft tissue. The two bits of golden were 99 million years of age.

Distorted skulls

The creators said the animal was hard to categorize, yet by utilizing CT outputs to separate, analyze and compare at each bone from the two species, they distinguished attributes that recognized the animals as lizards.

These included the presence of scales; teeth attached directly to the jawbone instead of nestled into sockets, as dinosaur teeth were; lizardlike eye structures and shoulder bones; and a hockey-stick-shaped skull that is all around shared by other scaled reptiles.

In the better-saved example, the group recognized a raised crest running down the highest point of the nose and a fold of free skin under the jaw that may have been expanded in show, qualities shared by different reptiles.

The creators accept that the two species’ skulls had gotten distorted as the golden, produced using globs of sap from old tree bark, hardened around them. They said that Oculudentavis khaungraae’s nose was crushed into a narrower, more beaklike shape while Oculudentavis naga’s braincase was packed.

The contortions amplified birdlike features in a single skull and lizardlike highlights in the other, said coauthor Edward Stanley, overseer of the Florida Museum of Natural History’s Digital Discovery and Dissemination Laboratory.

“Imagine taking a lizard and pinching its nose into a triangular shape,” Stanley said in a statement. “It would look a lot more like a bird.” Birds are the only living relatives of dinosaurs.

An ethical minefield

Some of paleontology’s most exciting finds as of late have emerged from northern Myanmar’s rich amber deposits. Much of the amber finds its approach to business sectors in southwest China, where it is purchased by collectors and scientists. Be that as it may, moral worries about who profits by the offer of golden have arisen, especially since 2017, when Myanmar’s military assumed responsibility for golden mines. Government powers and ethnic minorities have battled around here for quite a long time, and a United Nations report has blamed the military of torture, abductions, rape and sexual violence.

The examination creators said in the news discharge that the golden was bought by gemologist Adolf Peretti before 2017 from an approved organization that has no connections to Myanmar’s military, and cash from the deal didn’t uphold equipped clash.

They said utilization of the example followed rules set out by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, which has requested that associates cease from chipping away at golden sourced from Myanmar since June 2017.

“As scientists we feel it is our job to unveil these priceless traces of life, so the whole world can know more about the past. But we have to be extremely careful that during the process, we don’t benefit a group of people committing crimes against humanity,” Daza said.

“In the end, the credit should go to the miners who risk their lives to recover these amazing amber fossils.”

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